Intervention is Key to Brain Development; So Why Are the Immensely Traumatized Not Receiving It?

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While this may not be a large reason Black children are seen taking their lives at such a high rate, it is impacting their mental health and it is time someone says something.

As neurobiological research shows, children’s very brain development can be altered by violence. This is why intervention is so vital; but what happens when intervention isn’t received, be it due to lack of access or due to disbelief in mental health; or perhaps it is so on going it isn’t even an after thought?

Do not get me wrong, the shootings at columbine and other school shooting are sad. But what about the kids who live in fear, day by day, because of shootings? I have been angry that no light has been shed on these children for a long time, and as I do my research regarding why Black children are taking their lives so early, it enrages me even more.

While I do agree that more Black therapists and psychologists are needed -because these children face what no white or any other ‘color’ can comprehend on a personal level- someone needs to be doing something. It’s not fair these kids are being alienated and shoved aside while these predominately white schools are making headlines.

And receiving the help they need. No matter the color trauma impacts the brain and the brains development which impacts children unless intervention is created be it with therapy or some other form of counseling.

It also needs to be known that expressing your emotions is not weak, and that mental health is real. Another common factor vital to helping children, teens and adults heal is removal of the tragedy that traumatized the child. In communities faced with immense fear, who can’t even trust the police which so many white people take for granted and then have the nerve to say there is no white privilege; I think this short but factual post gives a little insight into what, I believe, was planned.

The government wants to keep the community in disarray and they are doing it with neglect and internal conflict. Something needs to be done, for suicide, homicide and for the unification of us all. They cannot be allowed to win- we MUST stop buying into their twisted game.

On that note, I will have a video and written post up sometime today or tomorrow as this all keeps taking turns in every direction given the immense problems faced due to denial, ignoring and degrading; all of which are wrong and damaging youth and children, the future, alike.

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*Against All Odds…* “The Black Experience in Business”- Things They Didn’t Teach in School- Documentary

As I prepare for my first release of heartbreaking information, hidden information it would seem, regarding health care and the Black community; children, to make it even worse, I figured I need to maintain a balance on my page for within the community, be it historical or present day, there is something amazing and empowering about what can be done when the community unites…

I feel it is just as important to highlight the tragedies going on, as well as acknowledge the buried history of Black men and women in America (as well as outside of America, but I’m trying to stay on topic.) I’ll be posting random positive posts such as this on and off as we go through the mental health crisis and more, for it is important never to forget…In fact, to KNOW or REMEMBER… They didn’t teach this in school for a reason, and as KRS-One asked, “WHY IS THAT?”

Click Here to go the PBS website and view the documentary for free. For some reason, it isn’t letting me embed it on my page 😐

Learn about the untold story of African American entrepreneurship, where skill, industriousness, ingenuity and sheer courage in the face of overwhelming odds provide the backbone of this nation’s economic and social growth.

BlackGirlPodcast Speaks on Mental Health AND Personality Disorders! Must Listen!

personality disorders mental health in the black community blackgirlpodcastWhile waiting for the next post and video I felt it crucial to post this. Mental health is stigmatized enough, but personality disorders in particular are something that most people -regardless of what ‘color’ they are or where they come from- tend to want to ignore, sadly.

WHAT ARE PERSONALITY DISORDERS?

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) American Psychiatric Association (2013), personality disorders can be explained as follows:

Personality is the way of thinking, feeling and behaving that makes a person different from other people. An individual’s personality is influenced by experiences, environment (surroundings, life situations) and inherited characteristics. A person’s personality typically stays the same over time. A personality disorder is a way of thinking, feeling and behaving that deviates from the expectations of the culture, causes distress or problems functioning, and lasts over time. “

Read more about personality disorders here.

As someone who suffers from trauma related mental health issues, I know how shaming it may feel to admit, let alone have. It is hard enough sharing myself! And the stigma against personality disorders as a whole is not helped by the misunderstanding and stereotyping especially. In particular, borderline personality disorder is widely misrepresented as an abusive, controlling group of people who are all about themselves but in reality that is a rarity and the exact opposite is true.

Hollywood has taken disorders, such as Borderline PD, and misrepresented what they actually are. The majority of professionals in the medical field agree, mental illnesses and suffering should not be thrown about so carelessly, nor used for entertainment. I have to agree.

Back to the point.

I was excited to see a podcast by the name of BlackGirlPodcast not only speaking out on mental health; but on personality disorders as well! This is the sort of advancement the mental health community, especially within the Black community, need. I highly suggest educating oneself on personality disorders, and remembering there is no shame in having any mental illness. Reaching out for help is not weak, though it is understandable why so many don’t or rather, can’t. But that’s for another post.

In the episode spoken of, BlackGirlPodcast speaks with New York City based psychiatrist, Dr. Jessica Clemons, not only on mental health care, but even more impressive is their inclusion of about personality disorders and Black Mental Health Awareness.

Listen to Podcast

 

 

Introduction Post- Mental Health Series- What Is Coming-

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I felt a need to write this introduction and give anyone who may be reading my upcoming posts an idea of what will be discussed… This post doesn’t hold the details I want to share but gives a small overview of what I will be sharing over the upcoming months.  I hope the introduction makes sense, if anyone has anything to add,  or any questions please, leave a comment or message me. P
lease note I will be covering the topic of Mental Health in the Black community in every aspect I’ve yet to come up with, but if you feel there is anything missing again, I please share.

It is important to know as a trigger warning that the upcoming posts will speak of topics such as suicide and mental health among all ages, including very young children. I will be sharing a few stories in detail and will put warnings on them also because I don’t want anyone triggered; on the contrary, -and I am sure you will- I hope everyone feels the disgust at this racist country and just how low it goes, I hope you will fell the sickness in the pit of your stomach and the rage in your veins as facts and information on mental health that has been ignored for far too long -especially suicide, and suicidal behaviors.

I will be discussing the current tragedy with the little children, children being 5- 12 years of age, first due to its intensity and rarity. Also I hope it will give reason for anyone who otherwise would not consider the very real concrete fact of mental illness, and be able to learn to embrace it, the mind is power… Just because a physical ailment isn’t held doesn’t lessen the severity or risk of death by any means.

My plan on doing this in sum is:

Posting this as a very brief introduction to let you guys know I haven’t backe dout, I just have been frustrated with compressing a topic that needs the opposite of compression. Splitting it into different posts should help with that. And these upcoming posts will consist of more detailed essays in relation to mental health, mental illness,  what it means and why it is not something to shun or be ashamed of.

Open dialogue is past due and I hope these posts can assist in finding a place of understanding or acceptance, for this has been shrugged off for far too long. It truly, truly is becoming an urgent epidemic and lives that could be saved if they only could speak out, are being lost for the inability, the “shame” and “embarrassment” – the “unmanly behavior” of speaking up and most importantly, speaking out, when you are struggling mentally.

Speaking from a psychological stand point, I will be discussing different types of trauma, what it does to the development of the human brain and the lasting impact it has when not addressed and that child worked with until they are able to move on. Kids, especially young, have an amazing resilience in them. Especially during the developmental stages. If trauma is stopped and proper care given -and the big one, the situation changed as well, a child can go on, more like than not, to live their lives without the trauma following them into adulthood and manifesting into a mental health crisis of any form.

With that, I will share what has been proven to work, but it will take the community to unify and for that we have to get this violence to stop. It is all the same source, just as Ta-Nehisi Coates talks about in Between the World and Me, I know it seems impossible; most of my loved ones think it a hopeless fight; but it isn’t. After this series, I will be posting facts, laws and policies formed on racism and still fueled by that same sick racist mentality. Knowledge is the key; the ancestors tell us that! Evil cannot last or win forever; it’s time is coming to an end = but we have to be aware, we must also take action… I admit I don’t know how to stop the violence, but there has to be a way… There HAS to be, it is not impossible.

And we start to create hope by working on figuring out what that exactly is we need to be doing to stop the insanity on the streets, and in the legal system. They don’t expect anyone to stand up against it; and for that reason it must be done.

A little bit more of things to come is a theory I want to share from a book I recently read. In fact, I last posted a review on that very book, Black Suicide. It’s a psychological theory of suicide by life style, in short, and I hope in some way it will open eyes and help everyone to aid in stopping the readiness to die in far too many young men and women.

I will be discussing the medical history of Black people in America and the cruel, unacceptable “treatments” forced upon innocent men, women and children- of course, this has an impact on how things are perceived today.

.What is really frustrating me is the repeated, “and we don’t know what the cause of this rise in suicide is”- it doesn’t take much brilliance to easily see the reasons in my opinion, which I will discuss in upcoming posts. And I truly beg  each and every reader to add their words to increase awareness, open communication and most importantly, help educate people on what sources there are for this relatively new research. [Research showed Black children and suicide to be a higher risk in the early 1990s. Not that it matters when it comes down to the facts, for those who want a stamp of validity on this topic, you have it now as finally, this research has been once again conducted, reviewed and confirmed as truth by JAMA and many other related American Medical Association (AMA) research journals.

As I have noted I will be sharing my research on how racism impacts the development and growth of Black children and youth. This research has taken me far beyond any realm I had before imagined I am sad to say. I want to share it with anyone willing to listen because racism, lack of family and denial of mental health care all are feeding a vicious, racist cycle.

I also believe it is important to explore the reasons, history, culture and other behind the taboo views of mental health within a great deal of the community. What can be done to stop, or help as much as possible, this tragic epidemic is my ultimate question and ideas will be shared however mine nor yours are any good unless first we can get across and grasp the fact that yes, mental illness is real and it does inflict its torment on people, all people are at risk for mental illness; be it something common as depression or more severe such as PTSD or personality disorders. There is no shame in this.

There is only shame in not being able to talk about it. In allowing trauma and illness to manifest in a people and expect them to deal with it, not speak on it, that is where the shame lies. That is where too many unwarranted deaths lie. That is where behavioral problems stem. Of all racial groups, I believe the Black community has an overwhelming amount of trauma to deal with daily that others don’t understand or know about.

The trauma of being targeted by those who are supposed to protect, by the government period and many other afflictions needs to be talked about. The place I believe we should start is with the children. It is here, with precious young, Black children research shows a peak in suicide, one that is only increasing. I’m talking about 4, 5 year olds taking their own life. This should be a national emergency, but it is not and that makes it even more important the people make sure to end the stigma, and open up about their own emotions, as well as learn how to help others; especially the children. 

 

 

Book Review: Between the World & Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Between the World and MeBetween the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is one of those rare books that grab you by the core of your soul, refusing to let go. So I will start our with…

Wow. Simply wow.

This book was so powerful I had to put it down at times, to let this reality sink in. This book is eloquently written in the fashion of a letter; preparing him for life as a Black man in the country his ancestors built, the slavery and racism still felt today, the history and culture denied, along with justice in the legal system. What is it like to live your life in fear?

I challenge everyone to read this book; but above all I call on anyone who is not Black to read and let the reality so foreign come over you. Walk in his shoes through his childhood and his lessons, his fears, his love and pains. But this book doesn’t stop with racism against Blacks by non-Blacks, but being also part memoir, he delves into his childhood. Gangs, fear, thick fear, trying to act fearless; looking back and seeing who was the most afraid of all. He takes us to Howard University, where he for the first time gets to experience what he calls, “Black Mecca” for all the different nationalities and cultures among the beautiful Black men and women he saw around him. Police brutality hits him personally, and the tone is felt through out all of the book. Fatherless and/or broken homes, drug dealers and those lurking with guns -be it the local gangs or the police- the death and trauma he had experienced he doesn’t want for his son. That much is clear and no good father would; so he speaks of all different memories, and the moments behind each where, despite the good and joy, the weight of “his body” was ever present.

By that same note, however, he also doesn’t want to give his son false hope or false comfort. So, like his grandparents did to him, during more recent and actually televised police brutalities and murders, he describes what it feels like to be a father that cannot make the world safe for his son, and his son, indeed will grow up in, and already lives in, a dangerous world where he has to consider things, at times life or death choices, simple choices; choices he is only being tested on due to the color of his skin… These burdens fall down upon the Black youth as well as Mr. Coates son, and though cynical with the world he wants so painfully badly to believe things will be okay; so painfully it made me cry.

At times his pain, the pain he felt for his child, the realities they both face -along with my loved ones and friends, along with countless people alive right now I don’t know and never will, they all have the same fear… And it’s not one that spreads itself equally among the people. This is a fear that has locked on, for damn well good reasons, to so many.

This heartbreaking reality of being at a ‘privilege’ was never something I didn’t both see and hate growing up; but hearing a man speak out on how it is to live the side my friends and others live, cuts me deep and the guilt I feel for having pigmentation I don’t even want is very painful. But what would be worse would be to turn away; to pretend it isn’t there. To not fight it but abuse it.

I do not believe a white person who has compassion and wants to understand can ever again deny the fact of double standards- I saw these growing up and hated it then as I do now. It hurts realizing because you have light skin you’re likely not to be shot, beat, harassed, have the cops called on you for your dog playfully runs up to a white woman (that was in the news today)- Blacks and whites have different social worries; I’m not sure what whites have to fear nor why they are in denial of white privilege; especially after reading this book. 

HIGHLY recommended!

All I can say is beyond mind blowing. Everyone needs to be required to read this.. I will write a better review later, I must go now, but please, GO GET THIS BOOK!

View all my reviews

Random page with random knowledge on it. He

 

Racism in Medicine- A Doctor & His Story

I have so much research to compress and present, and I will begin with Black children and mental health… I thought, however, it may be a good to repost this as I work on the upcoming new post, or video, or slide… I am not sure how to present all of this… But I am going to do it, so please stay tuned!

Thoughts and Writings on a Growing Crisis

white people are hypocritesFirst, I need to apologize for my delay in posting. I am still conducting research and gather works for my larger release on the impact of modern day racism (and in history) and how it is impacting innocent Black children. I have decided, however, because this is a topic that is vital, a topic that rages onward sadly outside of childhood and is a huge health problem in the Black community for men and women of all ages.

Last year this tragic, silent killer was reported by the Center of Disease Control (CDC) showing the biggest increase for suicide risk is between the ages of 5 – 11 years of age in Black children… That takes my breath away. It also fuels me for my other posts that will soon come.

The CDC also released information late last year showing an increase in suicide among the above noted ages in…

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!Black Suicide-Book Review!

This book is full of information and stories from the suicides survivors; families, friends, etc. It is FREE TO READ on Amazon Unlimited, but this is one I had to go ahead and buy. Too much knowledge packed in.
Highly Suggested!
Black Suicide: The Tragic Reality of America's Deadliest SecretBlack Suicide: The Tragic Reality of America’s Deadliest Secret by Alton R. Kirk

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

There are a few books that I believe need to be mandatory reading for anyone who is simply concerned for humanity, for the children, for mental health awareness. This book also will benefit anyone who is engaged in helping bring awareness to mental illness, for those who want and actively work to end the stigma towards mental illness and breaking the stigma there is towards it; especially within the Black community.

One thing Mr. Kirk speaks on is the different needs between the Black and white communities. This is no empty statement; he goes on to explain why this indication is true and afterwards, as sad as it is to me, he is right. I wish we lived in a world where color doesn’t matter in any community, but of course white people can’t understand the struggles, fears and worries Black people go through on a day to day basis; how, then, could the majority of white psychologists help other than show compassion and sorrow?

He goes out of his way to make a point that this is no mere book; and he proves that point with a break from the facts and information on what’s going on, and gives the floor to survivors of those who have taken their own lives. These people are brave, some of their family still so stuck in the stigmatism associated with mental health they don’t want others to know. Still, these people spoke out and it is there stories that turn this already tragic book into a reality; a reality that makes you want to take action, expose lies and help everyone realize there is nothing shaming, demeaning or anything else that would make a person less than a man due to struggling with mental health problems. It has nothing to do with manhood, strength or anything like that.

I also must add really quickly… I am so grateful he mentions that there is more than one type of suicide, and that is so very important to me for personal reasons. The different types of suicide he speaks out on include more than just the “conventional” (for lack of better phrasing) but also recklessness, dangerous behavior some people develop knowing they want to die. Putting oneself on the front line, so to speak, waiting for someone else to take their life. Instead of this we should be reaching out for one another, not taking another life.

It has to do with saving lives; and I hope if you are reading this review, no matter who you are, you will read this book and feel the same fire to help in any way possible to expose, remind and help make changes so the suicide rates will drop.

This is a necessary read for anyone concerned with the betterment and empowerment of humanity.

View all my reviews

Independent Research Regarding Mental Health Care In the Black Community

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